Pediatric endocrinologists are doctors who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of children with diseases of the endocrine system. The endocrine system includes different glands or organs that are in control of hormones and body functions that affect growth, metabolism, puberty, and fertility. Hormones are chemical messengers that regulate body functions by transmitting information from one cell to another. Increased or decreased action of these hormones can cause disease. 

The endocrine glands which produce hormones include, among other organs, the pituitary gland which controls growth and also controls other endocrine glands, the thyroid gland which is involved in important cell functions and metabolism, the testes in boys and the ovaries in girls that are responsible for pubertal development and fertility and the pancreas which, when impaired, leads to diabetes.  


The Pediatric Endocrinology clinic sees patients at the Glassrock Building on the campus of UC Davis Medical Center:

UC Davis Medical Center
Glassrock Building
2521 Stockton Blvd., 3rd floor
Sacramento

To schedule an appointment at our clinic,
please call 800-UCD-4-KIDS.

Pediatric Endocrine care is provided by a group of world-renowned doctors, experienced nurses, dieticians and social worker who function together as a comprehensive team to our culturally-rich patients and their families.

Dr. Dennis Styne

Dr. Dennis M. Styne holds the Yocha Dehe Endowed Chair in Pediatric Endocrinology. He has performed research in many aspects of pediatric endocrinology and has written textbooks and numerous chapters on the field which are used by doctors around the world. He developed international guidelines on the prevention, evaluation and treatment of childhood obesity. Due to his interest in decreasing health disparities, he developed an outreach program to improve health for families living at Northern California Indian rancherias that promotes communication with the UC Davis Health based children's specialists. His research focuses on improving therapies for various pediatric endocrine conditions. He published a text book on pediatric endocrinology that is used by providers worldwide.

Dr. Nicole Glaser

Dr. Nicole Glaser is the Dean’s Professor of Pediatric Diabetes and has interests in type 1 diabetes care in children as well as all other pediatric endocrine conditions. Her research emphasis is on pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), an acute, life-threatening complication of diabetes, and brain injury related to DKA in children.  She developed international guidelines for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis and has written a large number of research papers and chapters in the field. 

Dr. Lindsay Loomba-Albrecht

Dr. Lindsey Loomba-Albrecht is an expert in all types of pediatric endocrine diseases. Her Chico clinic provides care for children north of UCDMC. She has written chapters in pediatric textbooks to teach other doctors about pediatric endocrine diseases. Her research interest focuses on the effect of family functioning on the control of blood glucose in children with diabetes.  

Dr. Abigail Fruzza

Dr. Abigail Fruzza provides expert care for all types of pediatric endocrine condition in our UCDMC clinic.  Besides treating children at UCDMC, she also holds telemedicine clinics to provide pediatric endocrinology services to distant sites for children who cannot physically reach UCDMC. 

Dr. Stephanie Crossen

Dr. Stephanie Crossen skillfully treats children with all types of pediatric endocrine diseases. Her research focuses on new ways to deliver care in order to improve outcomes and prevent complications for children with type 1 diabetes. 

Dr. Armaiti Mody

Dr. Mody's academic interests include Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, obesity, and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). She has a particular interest in alternative approaches to diagnosing and managing PCOS in both adolescents and young adults. Her research primarily focuses on improving our understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology around PCOS as well as management of this disorder in adolescent females.